How to Install Oracle VirtualBox Additions in Fedora 22

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I’ve had to beat around the bush in past distros, and finally found a pretty straight forward way to get the VirtualBox Additions working on my Fedora Virtual Machines under Oracle Virtual Box. It’s handy because you get all the native mouse and display support. Here’s all you have to do.

Once you’re at the Fedora Gnome Desktop, click on Activities (or press the windows key on your keyboard) and type terminal. Then click on the terminal icon.

Quick note, they replaced yum with dnf, don’t panic, the yum command still work. Anyway …

Enter the following:

su

(type your password)

dnf -y update kernel*

dnf -y install kernel-headers kernel-devel dkms

Reboot

Insert the disk and run it.

VboxAdditions

You’ll have to enter a username and password.

When it’s all done, you should see something like this:

VboxAdditionsInstall

Then reboot again.

How to Change your Password from the Command Line in Windows

ChangePasswordCommandPrompt

I mainly run into this when I’m using a server core install, but this works on pretty much any version of Windows. The only caveat is that you need to be an administrator on the system.

Of course, you need to run an elevated command prompt as well.

Just enter the following, and you’ll be prompted to enter the password and confirm it.

net user %username% *

You can also run the following command, which specifies the password:

net user %username% %password%

So, if BoDuke wanted to set his password, he would enter:

net user BoDuke *

or to specify a password of “GeneralLee4Life!” he would use:

net user BoDuke GeneralLee4Life!

Fix the OneNote 2010 Screen Clipping Shortcut Key

OneNote2010_print

I ran into a bit of a unique issue today, and it had to do with the Onenote Screen Clipping Shortcut key. Now if you’re a long time OneNote User, you’re probably used to the Windows+S shortcut key for starting a screen clipping.

Well, in Windows 8.1, Microsoft hijacked that shortcut key for search everywhere. Either way, OneNote’s shortcut was changed to Windows+Shift+S. I’ll admit, it took me a little while to get used to, but I’m good now.

However, one of my users is running Windows 8.1, and OneNote 2010, and OneNote is still using the Windows+S shortcut key, but it doesn’t work. To fix this, you can take 1 of 3 paths.

1. Disable the Windows +S shortcut key for Windows.

Once you free it up, OneNote will be able to use it. To do this, run the following command:

reg.exe add HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced /v DisabledHotkeys /t REG_SZ /d S /f

2. Change the OneNote Shortcut to a different Key combination

For Office 2010, open registry editor, and naviate to:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\OneNote\Options\Other

Note: The 14.0 designates Office 2010, Use 15.0 for Office 2013, 12.0 for Office 2007.

There should be a DWORD value of “ScreenClippingShortcutKey”, if there isn’t, create one (32-bit DWORD). Change the value to 41 (Hexadecimal) and you’re new shortcut key will be Windows+a.

3. Get a New Version of OneNote

It’s free for personal use, so why don’t you get the new version? I’m only limited because it’s in an enterprise environment, and I’m waiting to roll out the entire office suite.

 

I went with the first option, since pressing start and typing seems to have the same, if not better, search capabilities.

Hope that helps!

Source

Fedora Replaced Yum with DNF ?!?!

First off, I was kind of shocked yesterday when I went to grab an ISO of Fedora 21, and realized that 22 had been released. I hadn’t read or seen anything that mentioned it was coming out. Not that I’m all the hyped up to grab the latest version or anything.

I guess it’s actually been coming for a long time, but I’m not very current on most Linux news. I personally prefer CentOS, but it seems like the only version of Linux that my coworkers use is Fedora, so that’s what I have to support. I guess I can count my blessings though, at least it isn’t Ubuntu 😉

The side benefit of this is that Fedora and CentOS are pretty close, so I don’t usually have to learn the commands / how to do things two different ways.

From the article linked above, it sounds like DNF is going to be better than YUM, and actually started out as a fork from Yum.

According to tecmint, DNF is going to replace yum in Centos and Redhat as well, so that works for me 🙂